Bainbridge Island Quilt Fest – Log Cabin Challenge

At our recent Bainbridge Island Quilt Fest, there was a display of quilts made by members of the Bainbridge Island Modern Quilt Guild who participated in their challenge. The challenge was to make a quilt inspired by the traditional Log Cabin block. There was a size limitation of a maximum of 24″ x 24″. The great variety of interpretations was wonderful. I stood as a docent in this area for a couple of hours and people were delighted and intrigued by the different artistic outcomes. It’s fascinating to see the results of this type of challenge, and I encourage you to participate in challenges. It definitely stretches us and encourages original thought and expression. 

 

Bainbridge Island Quilt Fest – Highlights 2

On Saturday 8th September, the Bainbridge Island Modern Quilt Guild hosted the 6th annual Quilt Fest in downtown Winslow. A couple of weeks ago, I posted some overview pictures. Last week’s blog and this one highlight a selection of quilts which particularly appealed to me. Marybeth O’Halloran’s New Hexagon Millefiore quilt was absolutely magnificent. I posted pictures of this in February when Marybeth was the featured artist at our Kitsap Quilters Guild, but it deserves airing again.

This was a block of the month English paper piecing pattern designed by Katja Marek to go along with her New Hexagon block.. It was constructed using both hand and machine sewing and took Marybeth almost three years to complete. The attention to detail and fussy-cutting of animal motifs such as the bees and poodles shown make this quilt all the more remarkable. Marybeth is a master at her long-arm machine so the whole quilt is enhanced by her beautiful quilting. Visit her website here.

On the left is another of Marybeth’s quilts, Corona, made using the Tula Nova pattern by Tula Pink. Marybeth made it into a color wheel and enjoyed doing the English paper piecing by machine. The colorful quilt on the right is It’s Always Wine O’clock in Napa made by Monca Guckenheimer and quilted by Dionne Matthie-Buban. It was started in a workshop by Denyse Schmidt in Napa. Students took sample blocks and experimented with the shapes, sizes and placement.

Here’s another vibrant and colorful quilt. Behind the Waterfall was made by Kendra Allen and quilted by Marybeth O’Halloran. It began as Total Chaos by Karla Alexandra, but it wasn’t chaotic enough so Kendra cut it into 2-1/2″ strips, sewed it back together again and added sparky crystals. I love the strongly stated star quilt on the right. Starfish was made by Dand Dimmick Scarp and quilted by Gladys Schulz. The pattern is Under the Sea by Barbara H. Cline. It uses a template that works with diamonds. The diamonds connecting the star elements add so much to this quilt.

 

 

 

Bainbridge Island Quilt Fest – Highlights 1

On Saturday 8th September, the Bainbridge Island Modern Quilt Guild hosted the 6th annual Quilt Fest in downtown Winslow. Last week, I posted photos of an overview. In this blog and my next one, I will highlight a few quilts that particularly appealed to me.

Off to Work, was made by Liz Walters who upcylcled thrift shop finds, using a wonderful selection of ties set on a background of men’s shirts. The pattern came from the 2016 Art of the Quilt Calendar by Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr. Liz opted to arrange the tie blocks vertically rather than horizontally.

I love this double sided quilt, Color Play, by Katie Wilson. The two sides are so different but they work together. The back is playful and fun. Katie’s quilt is based on the Power of Nine pattern by Sheri Noel using Sheri’s quilt as you go tutorial.

On the left, 680 Nanometers, (which is the wavelength of red light), was made by Erica Page Johnson. Erica challenged herself to work with a dark, low-contrast palette, but could not resist adding the pop of bright red. The quilt is the result of a Katie Pedersen’s Psychedelic Baby workshop. The large stitch quilting is by hand. On the right, Desert Knock Off, was made by Honora Dunkak and quilted by Marybeth O’Halloran. The pattern is by Valerie Wells and Honora found it when visiting Valerie’s store, The Stitchin’ Post, in Sisters, OR. Honora diverged from the pattern, choosing different colors and placements of the blocks. This is a spectacular quilt.

 

 

Bainbridge Island Quilt Fest – over view

Last Saturday, the Bainbridge Island Modern Quilt Guild hosted the 6th annual Quilt Fest in downtown Winslow. For the sixth year in a row, we were blessed with dry weather. It was a grey day, but the display of over 200 quilts made a colorful splash along our main street. The event was well attended and much appreciated by locals, and folks coming from further afield. Here’s an over view showing just a sampling of these beautiful quilts. The first quilt is one of two of mine displayed, Easter Morning, made from my original 16-piece Bargello blocks and featured in my book, Bargello Quilts with a Twist.

The show was started in 2013 by local fabric store owner Barbara Kirk, modeled on the outdoor annual quilt show in Sisters, OR. Guild members work with local merchants and landlords to accomplish the logistics of hanging all of the quilts with clothespins or clips from lines or poles. This is becoming an annual tradition which we hope will continue. In subsequent blogs I will highlight some individual quilts.

 

Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show

I’ve recently returned from a trip to Sisters, OR for the 43rd Annual Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show. I was traveling with a P & Q Tours group of 42 quilters from the UK. They began their tour by staying on Bainbridge Island where they joined in the 4th July festivities and watched our home town parade. They had a day to explore Seattle too. On their third day, I did a lecture for them in Port Gamble and they visited our lovely store, Quilted Strait. Then we did an evening boat trip to Blake Island for a salmon dinner at the lodge. We went on to Portland via Mount St Helens and then to Bend for a week of visiting quilt stores, quilter’s studios, sight seeing (Crater Lake and the High Desert Museum), and various quilting activities culminating in the magnificent outdoor show in Sisters. Here are some general views of the quilts all over the buildings and I will post more from a variety of exhibits in the coming weeks.

The UK Quilters brought several quilts for a special exhibit and we had a group photo by their display, (more on their quilts in a later blog).

 

North Carolina Quilt Symposium quilt show

In early July, I was a member of the teaching faculty at the North Carolina Quilt Symposium hosted by the Asheville Quilters’ Guild. 350 quilters were in attendance for the four days of events and classes from 17 teachers on the campus of the University of NC in Asheville. Their quilt show featured the work of the teachers and I’ve posted pictures of my contribution in an earlier blog. Here, I feature the incredible thread painted quilts of author and quilt artist Lea McComas from Colorado. Leah writes, “My work is representational with visual images that touch memory and emotion, forcing them to come forward in our consciousness for fresh analysis.” Check out her website.

“Crossing over, speaks to the subjugation of one culture by another. The title alludes to the cultural turmoil and change that would be forthcoming.” This is my favorite of Lea’s quilts that was displayed. The incredible detail of thread painting on this pair of quilts bring the scene to life, and she is able to convey all the different textures, creating the figures and their clothing, horses, water and more. These amazing quilts have dimension, depth and richness.

Bike Boys depicts cyclists on the The Fowler Sextuplet which was promoted at the Denver Cycle show in1896. The composition incorporates 91 fabrics in the fabric collage base, and was thread-painted with 114 threads, (approximately 9 miles of stitching!).

The Cobbler, is a portrait of a cobbler in Turkey. Power is Knowledge, shows African boys who live in a village without electricity. A solar lantern allows them to study after dark and education is their bridge to a better life.

North Carolina Quilt Symposium, Asheville, NC

A couple of weeks ago, I had the good fortune to be a member of the teaching faculty at the North Carolina Quilt Symposium hosted by the Asheville Quilters’ Guild. 350 quilters were in attendance for the four days of events and classes from 17 teachers on the campus of the University of NC in Asheville. We had a wonderful time and the Asheville quilters worked tirelessly to give us a warm welcome and to make everything run smoothly. Here is the banner which was ceremoniously passed along to the group hosting the event, “Quilt Stock”, next year at Lake Junaluska not far from Asheville. I love the quilt in the backdrop.

The quilt show was an exhibit of the teachers’ work and we were each invited to submit five quilts to represent our work and published material. My five quilts were all hung toether. Here are all five and a single shot of Winter Garden, my Bear’s Paw variations, featured in my book, Traditional Quilts with a Twist.

The other four quilt are as follows, from left to right:
Retro-Radiation made from 16 of my Op-Art Kaleidoscope blocks.
Gateway to Mongolia is based on a design from the door of a yurt. This Olzii symbol is thought to bring long life and prosperity and in the Buddhist faith it symbolizes the universe and never-ending cycles of life and death.

Bainbridge Delft,  the blue and white quilt, is made from 24 of my original 16-piece Bargello blocks and is featured in my book, Bargello Quilts with a Twist. The book may be ordered from my on-line store.
Brideshead Radiance,
 is a 28″ Feathered Star with borders added. The borders were inspired by a wooden table with an inlaid wooden pattern which I saw at Castle Howard in Yorkshire, UK. The movie, Brideshead Revisited was filmed there, hence the name of the quilt.
Patterns are available for Gateway to Mongolia, Brideshead Radiance and the Op-Art Kaleidoscope technique at my on-line store. For the Op-Art Kaleidoscope technique, check out my YouTube Videos.

Kitsap Quilters’ Guild Show (5) – Maggie’s small selection

At our recent Kitsap Quilters’ Guild show, over 200 quilts were exhibited displaying the wide range of talent in our guild and a large variety of techniques used. In previous blogs, I’ve already shared pictures from our featured artist, some Round Robins and some animal quilts. This collection shows just some of the many quilts that appealed to me for a variety of reasons. I like quilts with strong designs and those in which the use of color and value enhance the patterns. The use of black in first two makes stunning backgrounds to intensify the scrappy colors.

Linda Eakin-Johnson made this striking Curved Log Cabin quilt, quilted by Linda Moran, after taking a class from Ann Trujullo at Quilted Strait. She had a collection of Asian fabrics and used all 1,500 pieces! I love how the black fabric makes curved ribbons between the medley of scrappy logs. Checkerboard Garden, was made by Carol Kunold and quilted by Mirium Gill. The pattern is by Jason Yenter and I like how effective this very simple idea of a strippy quilt with assorted small squares and a fussy-cut large scale print with a black background works.

These two are very intricate with foundation paper-pieced triangles. On the left, Tumble, was pieced and quilted by Pam Knight. The pattern for this stunning quilt is Fire Island Costa by Judy Niemeyer. Pam dug into her stash of French General fabrics to create her own look. Her machine-quilting is exquisite and really enhances the quilt. Something Blue was made by Becky Rico and quilted by Teresa Silva, using a pattern by Jacqueline De Jonge. I have a soft spot for classic blue and white quilts. The next ones have a more modern feel.

Marj Deupree made this Prism quilt which is so bright and dimensional, and the Fruit Slices, a variation on the Courthouse Steps Log Cabin, (pattern by Monique Jacobs). The use of color in these two quilts really makes them pop.

On the left, a-MAZE-ing, was made by Mary Ann Hooker and quilted by Linda Moran. Mary Ann used the Antelope Canyon and Garden Delights pattern by Laurie Shifrin. Her persistence with ripping and re-sewing after discovering mistakes in three out of the four blocks, paid off and the finished quilt is beautiful. Becky Rico made Hexie Hexies, (quilted by Linda Moran), after being inspired by an antique quilt of a similar design. She enjoyed updating this pattern with more contemporary fabrics and the white background makes it look fresh and modern.

 

 

 

Kitsap Quilter’s Guild Show (4) – Animal Quilts

At our recent Kitsap Quilters’ Guild show, these wonderful animal quilts made me smile and I wanted to share them with you. We’ll begin with the birds. The Rooster, was made by Terry Loy using a fusible applique pattern by Laura Heine. Most of the fabrics are Kaffe Fassett with additional pieces from Terry’s collection to create different textures. I love this vibrant, colorful bird. Anne Trujillo made the Dancing with the stars bird quilt using Sue Spargo’s book, Bird Dance, for inspiration. The vintage lace came from Anne’s mother and vintage buttons were donated by Dorothy Thompson. Each bird has dupini silk beaded collar and a piece of Kaffe Fassett material. Check out the details on the close up pictures.

The detail on this cat quilt, Brownie, by Debi Snyder is amazing. This is Debi’s original design copied from a photo, using raw-edge applique enhanced with heavy thread work in the quilting. Brownie was hiding in the Christmas tree and Debi snapped a photo.

This playful fox quilt, Quilt for Kaci, was made by Sharon Broom from the pattern Kits ‘n’ Caboodle in Animal Parade, and quilted by Wanda Rains. Sharon used her own flowers and humming bird to improvise on the pattern. Jaxine Anderson made Giraffe using the fusible applique pattern Potpourri by Laura Heine. Jaxine loves giraffes and was captivated by this pattern. She collected the fabrics during a road trip to Chicago.

If I was in Charge, this rainbow of zebras, is an original design by Carol Bracher. Carol says “If I was in charge, zebras would be colorful!” She hand appliqued all the zebras’ stripes and made fuzzy yarn tails for them.

 

 

Kitsap Quilters’ Guild Show (3) – Round Robin Quilts

At our recent Kitsap Quilters’ Guild show, there were four round robin quilts made by a small group of quilters, The Sew What’s. The quilters, Nancy Mathisrud, Deana Cherry, Marj Deupree, and Cheri Searles, all began with the same central motif, then passed it on to one of the others for the next border. This continued so that all four quilters contributed to each quilt. They were challenged to design different borders and piece patterns that they hadn’t previously made.

Top left – Nancy Mathisrud, top right  –  Marj Deupree, bottom left -Cheri Searles and quilted by Nancy, and bottom right – Deana Cherry. Nancy, Marj and Deana all quilted their own quilts. I love how these quilts have developed with the addition of each border and how differently they turned out with each quilter setting their color palette of choice. This is so much fun and very inspiring.